Get your bike up and running with the Collective

Provo Bike Collective by Trevor Christensen -9380
Photo by Trevor Christensen</>
Provo Bike Collective by Trevor Christensen -9055
Photo by Trevor Christensen</>

Got a bike or two rusting away in the garage? Would you love to join the bicycle community but your tires are flat? Need some help with your chain? Maybe your handlebars don’t sit straight.

The Provo Bicycle Collective can provide help at a low cost and with the tools you’ll need. The Collective, at 397 E. 200 North, is community-owned and volunteer-run, a do-it-yourself bike shop with the largest selection of used parts and used bikes anywhere in Provo.

At the Collective, there’s no handing over your bicycle to someone else to fix it. You come in with your bike (or bikes) and they’ll teach you what to do. You learn the tricks and then one day, you can teach someone else, donate your time, parts and even buy a nice bike at a good price.

When I was a kid, I loved to bike. Now that I’m grown, I still love to ride but I doubly appreciate the many advantages of bicycle mobility. It’s fun and it’s a way to exercise and contribute to the community’s health. A bike ride is a beautiful thing and the Collective gets you out there!

Provo Bike Collective by Trevor Christensen -9110
Photo by Trevor Christensen</>
Provo Bike Collective by Trevor Christensen -9167
Photo by Trevor Christensen</>

You can see what the Provo Bicycle Collective is all about on their website bicyclecollective.org If you need a good, working bike you can buy one from the Collective for $100-$250 for an adult’s bike and $30-$50 for a child’s bike. (Inventory changes daily depending on donations.) You can buy parts at the Collective at generally half the price of what they cost new. There are also new items: tubes, grips, bar tape, cables, housing, locks and lights.

The people at the shop won’t fix your bike for you but they will teach and guide you. (And, if you prefer, they’ll recommend a good for-profit shop in the area where somebody will do it for you.)

At the Collective, use the shop benches and tools for $10 an hour. (Or work off the cost.)

So bring in that bike that’s been collecting dust in the shed. Even if it can’t be fixed, the scrap metal is valuable. You can mend your own, volunteer to help others, or organize an Eagle Scout project.

As always, in Provo, your bike needs a license. The fee is $1. Register at: provo.org and let’s go biking!

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